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Monday, March 24, 2008

Museum of Civilization





from my trip to Ottawa.... the museum of civilization was of particular interest to me, because the architect, Douglas Cardinal, had also designed the building where i studied music, Grande Prairie Regional College.






http://www.djcarchitect.com/

6 comments:

susan said...

Oh, what a wonderful concept. When I think of the potential for good the US had and how sadly it's fallen into technocratic, economic balkanization rather than efforts toward universal uplift, I could weep.

Gary said...

Terrific photo. I'm embarrassed to say that even though I've been to Ottawa many times, I haven't been to that museum yet...

lindsaylobe said...

Wonderful photo. I'm a person who heads for the nearest museum as the first port of call whenever I am travelling. The architecture is stunning!
Best wishes

grannyfiddler said...

susan - in many ways, canada is just a less nervy version of the US in that area, but i haven't given up hope.

gary - the photo was taken at roughly 1 a.m. after spending the evening with my friends' elderly neighbor, checking out a neighborhood celtic jam and a pub with a rather good band and excellent guacamole and guiness. then she had to show me her town on the way home. the museum was on the tour. no, she didn't sample the guiness... that was my job.

lindsay - i'm a museum nut too. we did go back during hours of operation and check out the inside, which is no less stunning than the exterior.

susan said...

Yeah, I know. I haven't actually been gone that long - family, friends and visits :-) Until I was 30 all the rednecks I ever met were Canadian ones.

I guess I'm just growing less tolerant of people not understanding that which needs to be learned soon.

grannyfiddler said...

susan - maybe it's part of aging... my tolerance levels are pretty low in that area too... it's the carefully cultivated, even malicious, self-serving, myopic IGNORANCE of some people that blows me over the top. mostly because they're largely very wealthy, and could easily afford to make changes that would make a difference.